art

Mary Lloyd Jones

November 17, 2017 0 Comments
Mary Lloyd Jones

Mary Lloyd Jones has been exhibiting her paintings since the 1960s.  She’s a consistent and prolific artist, and it can seem hard to find new things to say about her work – especially since she’s written and spoken often about it herself (many others have too, including Ann Price-Owen, Ceridwen Lloyd Morgan and Iwan Bala).  […]

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Sitting for Bernard

November 12, 2017 0 Comments
Sitting for Bernard

For over forty years, and with increased energy since 1990, Bernard Mitchell has been collecting people.  The people are artists and writers working in Wales, and his means of collecting them is the camera lens.  Many people have seen parts of his great project, the Wales Arts Archive, over the years.  In the 1990s the […]

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Carys Evans and her women

November 6, 2017 0 Comments
Carys Evans and her women

Just over a year since her last solo show in Swansea Carys Evans has another, in the Kooywood Gallery in Cardiff.  Again there are around forty paintings – large and small, on canvas and board, in oils, mixed media and pastel.  A dominant theme runs through many of them – the lives of women.  Not […]

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Rachel Whiteread and Walter Sickert

October 29, 2017 1 Comment
Rachel Whiteread and Walter Sickert

It might be a sign of increasing age, but these days I prefer the quieter Tate Modern to the glitz and gargantuism of Tate Britain.  Last weekend we went there early to see the retrospective of the sculptor Rachel Whiteread.  Most of the works are shown together in a single undivided room and there weren’t […]

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Boy in a window

October 15, 2017 2 Comments
Boy in a window

An old, long-abandoned factory in Swansea’s Strand.  It has two storeys, a stone wall at its base and a corrugated roof.  Below, the windows are boarded or blacked out.  Upstairs, where ragged glass hangs in the smashed panes, one window frame’s open.  At its base a round-faced young boy, with dark hair and jug ears, […]

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John Ystumllyn: an African in 18th century Eifionydd

August 27, 2017 7 Comments
John Ystumllyn: an African in 18th century Eifionydd

It wasn’t his real name, ‘John Ystumllyn’, but one the locals gave him. Another was ‘Jac Du’ or ‘Jack Black’. How he arrived, unwillingly, in north Wales is obscure. What is certain is that his origins were in Africa, and that he found a home for himself and his family in the Criccieth area in […]

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Alma-Tadema’s uncarnal classics

August 7, 2017 0 Comments
Alma-Tadema’s uncarnal classics

Alluring women in chiffon and sandals, bright marble benches, azure seas, flower petals falling like rain.  This was the recipe Lawrence Alma-Tadema hit on for his paintings of scenes from ancient Rome.  Thousands were drawn to buy them, or at least reproductions of them, in late Victorian and Edwardian England. It was all a long […]

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Mr Skates’s ring cycle

July 28, 2017 11 Comments
Mr Skates’s ring cycle

The row over the ‘Iron Ring’ proposed for Flint Castle seems to be over, so the time is right to think more calmly about what we’ve learnt. First, a quick summary of what happened (there is an ignominious prequel, which I’ll skip).  Cadw, responsible for safeguarding scheduled historic monuments in Wales, together with Visit Wales, the […]

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‘The Llanboidy molecatcher’ gan James Lewis Walters

July 22, 2017 0 Comments
‘The Llanboidy molecatcher’ gan James Lewis Walters

Sylwais i ar y llun am y tro cyntaf llynedd. Ar y pryd roeddwn i’n chwilio am bethau eraill yn Amgueddfa Sir Gâr, yn hen Balas yr Esgob yn Abergwili. Hongiai’r llun yn swil, mewn lle anamlwg y tu ôl i ddrws. Ei destun eithriadol ac arddull medrus a ddenodd fy llygad gyntaf. Arhosodd y llun […]

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Henry Holiday’s Boojum

June 23, 2017 3 Comments
Henry Holiday’s Boojum

Martin Gardner, in his annotated edition of Lewis Carroll’s comic poem The hunting of the Snark, includes all of the wood engraved illustrations made by Henry Holiday for the first edition in 1876.  He also reproduces a drawing Holiday made for the book, but which never appeared – a picture of the Boojum, which makes […]

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