politics

The Mundaneum

July 22, 2018 0 Comments
The Mundaneum

Until last week I’d never heard of the Mundaneum.  But it’s such an exceptional institution that it deserves to be much better known. To visit the Mundaneum as it is today you need to go the Wallonian city of Mons and search out the Rue de Nimy.  There, in an adapted department store, you’ll find […]

Continue Reading »

Tories go to Hell

July 8, 2018 2 Comments
Tories go to Hell

After a week of poisonous anarchy among our Tory rulers it seems apt to give space to a cartoon in Welsh, issued in Llanrwst as a woodcut print in around 1834-36 (according to Peter Lord). The artist is James Cope. Almost nothing is known about him, except that he was born in Caernarfonshire in 1805 […]

Continue Reading »

To Soweto by way of the Plough & Harrow

June 17, 2018 1 Comment
To Soweto by way of the Plough & Harrow

Of all the Great Causes we pursued back in our days of hope in the late 1970s and early 1980s, there was only one that came to an unambiguously good end: the abolition of apartheid in South Africa.  Wales was blessed with one of the most active Anti-Apartheid Movement organisations anywhere, and the cause united […]

Continue Reading »

Yn eisiau: Arlywydd Cymru

May 18, 2018 0 Comments
Yn eisiau: Arlywydd Cymru

Mae ein Brenhines cyn wydn â lledr.  Nid yw’n dangos chwaith unrhyw awydd i ildio ei lle’n fuan.  Ond yn hwy neu’n hwyrach bydd ei gorsedd yn wag, ac oni bai am ddamwain, neu benderfyniad annhebygol iawn, Charles Windsor a fydd yn dilyn ei fam, fel Brenin Charles III.  Neu fel ‘George VII’, os nad […]

Continue Reading »

Who is the happiest of us all?

April 14, 2018 0 Comments
Who is the happiest of us all?

The answer, of course, is Finland. Cris Dafis, in this week’s Golwg, reminded us about the World Economic Forum’s recent report on the ‘happiness’ of people living in individual countries.  In this country we still judge national success in traditional, narrowly economistic ways – typically in terms of GDP or economic growth or productivity.  From […]

Continue Reading »

On the naming of bridges

April 6, 2018 3 Comments
On the naming of bridges

Unsurprisingly the announcement this week by Alun Cairns, Secretary of State for Wales, that the Second Severn Crossing is to be renamed the ‘Prince of Wales Bridge’ has caused uproar. Perhaps it was intended to. Some have even suggested that the move is a dry run for the future announcement of a Welsh investiture of […]

Continue Reading »

Iaith a Brecsit

March 24, 2018 0 Comments
Iaith a Brecsit

Er Mehefin 2016 mae llawer o bobl yn cynnig llawer o resymau er mwyn ceisio esbonio pam dewisodd mwyafrif o bleidleiswyr Prydeinig i adael yr Undeb Ewropeaidd.  Rhesymau economaidd – yr awydd i gadw swyddi a chodi cyflogau, i sicrhau masnachu rhwyddach gyda gweddill y byd, i wario rhagor ar y gwasanaeth iechyd.  Rhesymau gwleidyddol […]

Continue Reading »

Wales and Brexit, by Emyr Lewis

March 17, 2018 1 Comment
Wales and Brexit, by Emyr Lewis

In this guest blog the lawyer and poet Emyr Lewis considers some of the complex questions, constitutional and legal, economic and cultural, that arise for Wales from the UK’s decision to leave the European Union.  The text was originally given on 8 March 2018 in Swansea University as the Royal Institution of South Wales’s St […]

Continue Reading »

Swansea’s rebel women

February 18, 2018 7 Comments
Swansea’s rebel women

For all their strengths in the campaign to gain votes for women Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst were by nature autocratic.  In 1907 some members of their Women’s Social and Political Union took exception to their announcement that the WSPU’s annual conference would be cancelled in future and that they themselves and their inner circle would […]

Continue Reading »

Orwell’s toads

January 20, 2018 3 Comments
Orwell’s toads

On 12 April 1946 the magazine Tribune published a short piece by George Orwell entitled Some thoughts on the common toad.  It’s not perhaps his most original essay – its central theme is the coming of spring, and how ubiquitous it is, even in the centre of a large city like London – but it […]

Continue Reading »